A Naturalistic Study of Dissociative Identity Disorder and Dissociative Disorder Not Otherwise Specified Patients Treated by Community Clinicians

Bethany Brand, Catherine Classen, Ruth Lanins, Richard Loewenstein, Scott McNary, Claire Pain, Frank Putnam

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

The goals of this naturalistic, cross-sectional study were to describe the patient, therapist, and therapeutic conditions of an international sample of dissociative disorder (DD) patients treated by community therapists and to determine if community treatment for DD appears to be as effective as treatment for chronic PTSD and conditions comorbid with DD. Analyses found that across both patient (N = 280) and therapist (N = 292) reports, patients in the later stages of treatment engaged in fewer self-injurious behaviors, had fewer hospitalizations, and showed higher levels of various measures of adaptive functioning (e.g., GAF) than those in the initial stage of treatment. Additionally, patients in the later stages of treatment reported lower symptoms of dissociation, posttraumatic stress disorder, and distress than patients in the initial stage of treatment. The effect sizes for Stage 5 versus Stage 1 differences in DD treatment were comparable to those published for chronic PTSD associated with childhood trauma and depression comorbid with borderline personality disorder. Given the prevalence, severity, chronicity, and high health care costs associated with DD, these results suggest that extended treatment for DD may be beneficial and merits further research.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages153-171
Number of pages19
JournalPsychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice, and Policy
Volume1
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2009

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Multiple Personality Disorder
Dissociative Disorders
Post-Traumatic Stress Disorders
Therapeutics
Self-Injurious Behavior
Borderline Personality Disorder
Health Care Costs
Hospitalization
Cross-Sectional Studies
Depression

Keywords

  • dissociation
  • dissociative disorders
  • dissociative identity disorder
  • trauma
  • treatment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

A Naturalistic Study of Dissociative Identity Disorder and Dissociative Disorder Not Otherwise Specified Patients Treated by Community Clinicians. / Brand, Bethany; Classen, Catherine; Lanins, Ruth; Loewenstein, Richard; McNary, Scott; Pain, Claire; Putnam, Frank.

In: Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice, and Policy, Vol. 1, No. 2, 01.06.2009, p. 153-171.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Brand, Bethany ; Classen, Catherine ; Lanins, Ruth ; Loewenstein, Richard ; McNary, Scott ; Pain, Claire ; Putnam, Frank. / A Naturalistic Study of Dissociative Identity Disorder and Dissociative Disorder Not Otherwise Specified Patients Treated by Community Clinicians. In: Psychological Trauma: Theory, Research, Practice, and Policy. 2009 ; Vol. 1, No. 2. pp. 153-171.
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