A mindful self-compassion videoconference intervention for nationally recruited posttreatment young adult cancer survivors: feasibility, acceptability, and psychosocial outcomes

Rebecca A. Campo, Karen Bluth, Sheila J. Santacroce, Sarah Knapik, Julia Tan, Stuart Gold, Kamaira Philips, Susan Gaylord, Gary N. Asher

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  • 1 Citations

Abstract

Purpose: Young adult (YA) cancer survivors report substantial distress, social isolation, and body image concerns that can impede successful reintegration into life years after treatment completion. Mindful Self-Compassion (MSC) interventions focus on developing mindfulness and self-compassion for managing distress, hardships, and perceived personal inadequacies. An MSC intervention would be beneficial in supporting YA survivors’ management of psychosocial challenges that arise in survivorship; however, a telehealth intervention modality is essential for reaching this geographically dispersed population. We conducted a single-arm feasibility study of an MSC 8-week videoconference intervention for nationally recruited YA survivors (ages 18–29). Methods: The MSC intervention was group-based, 90-minute videoconference sessions, held weekly over 8 weeks, with audio-supplemented home practice. Feasibility and acceptability were assessed via attendance rate and an intervention satisfaction scale. Baseline to post-intervention changes in psychosocial outcomes (body image, anxiety, depression, social isolation, posttraumatic growth, resilience, self-compassion, mindfulness) were assessed using paired t tests and Cohen’s d effect sizes. Results: Thirty-four participants were consented and 25 attended a videoconference group. Feasibility was established with 84% attending at least six of the eight sessions, and intervention acceptability was high (M = 4.36, SD = 0.40, score range = 1–5). All psychosocial outcomes, except for resilience, demonstrated significant changes (p < 0.002), with medium to large effect sizes (Cohen’s d > 0.5). Conclusion: YA survivors are interested in receiving an MSC videoconference intervention. Feasibility, acceptance, and potential psychosocial benefits of the intervention were demonstrated. Findings can be applied toward the design of an efficacy randomized controlled trial to improve quality of life for YA survivors in transition after cancer treatment.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages1759-1768
Number of pages10
JournalSupportive Care in Cancer
Volume25
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2017

Fingerprint

Videoconferencing
Survivors
Young Adult
Neoplasms
Mindfulness
Social Isolation
Body Image
Telemedicine
Feasibility Studies
Survival Rate
Anxiety
Randomized Controlled Trials
Quality of Life
Depression
Therapeutics
Growth

Keywords

  • Feasibility study
  • Intervention
  • Mindfulness
  • Self-compassion
  • Videoconference
  • Young adult cancer survivors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology

Cite this

A mindful self-compassion videoconference intervention for nationally recruited posttreatment young adult cancer survivors : feasibility, acceptability, and psychosocial outcomes. / Campo, Rebecca A.; Bluth, Karen; Santacroce, Sheila J.; Knapik, Sarah; Tan, Julia; Gold, Stuart; Philips, Kamaira; Gaylord, Susan; Asher, Gary N.

In: Supportive Care in Cancer, Vol. 25, No. 6, 01.06.2017, p. 1759-1768.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Campo, Rebecca A. ; Bluth, Karen ; Santacroce, Sheila J. ; Knapik, Sarah ; Tan, Julia ; Gold, Stuart ; Philips, Kamaira ; Gaylord, Susan ; Asher, Gary N./ A mindful self-compassion videoconference intervention for nationally recruited posttreatment young adult cancer survivors : feasibility, acceptability, and psychosocial outcomes. In: Supportive Care in Cancer. 2017 ; Vol. 25, No. 6. pp. 1759-1768
@article{dc95ca4b95454c1997dcf8e3aff11754,
title = "A mindful self-compassion videoconference intervention for nationally recruited posttreatment young adult cancer survivors: feasibility, acceptability, and psychosocial outcomes",
abstract = "Purpose: Young adult (YA) cancer survivors report substantial distress, social isolation, and body image concerns that can impede successful reintegration into life years after treatment completion. Mindful Self-Compassion (MSC) interventions focus on developing mindfulness and self-compassion for managing distress, hardships, and perceived personal inadequacies. An MSC intervention would be beneficial in supporting YA survivors’ management of psychosocial challenges that arise in survivorship; however, a telehealth intervention modality is essential for reaching this geographically dispersed population. We conducted a single-arm feasibility study of an MSC 8-week videoconference intervention for nationally recruited YA survivors (ages 18–29). Methods: The MSC intervention was group-based, 90-minute videoconference sessions, held weekly over 8 weeks, with audio-supplemented home practice. Feasibility and acceptability were assessed via attendance rate and an intervention satisfaction scale. Baseline to post-intervention changes in psychosocial outcomes (body image, anxiety, depression, social isolation, posttraumatic growth, resilience, self-compassion, mindfulness) were assessed using paired t tests and Cohen’s d effect sizes. Results: Thirty-four participants were consented and 25 attended a videoconference group. Feasibility was established with 84{\%} attending at least six of the eight sessions, and intervention acceptability was high (M = 4.36, SD = 0.40, score range = 1–5). All psychosocial outcomes, except for resilience, demonstrated significant changes (p < 0.002), with medium to large effect sizes (Cohen’s d > 0.5). Conclusion: YA survivors are interested in receiving an MSC videoconference intervention. Feasibility, acceptance, and potential psychosocial benefits of the intervention were demonstrated. Findings can be applied toward the design of an efficacy randomized controlled trial to improve quality of life for YA survivors in transition after cancer treatment.",
keywords = "Feasibility study, Intervention, Mindfulness, Self-compassion, Videoconference, Young adult cancer survivors",
author = "Campo, {Rebecca A.} and Karen Bluth and Santacroce, {Sheila J.} and Sarah Knapik and Julia Tan and Stuart Gold and Kamaira Philips and Susan Gaylord and Asher, {Gary N.}",
year = "2017",
month = "6",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1007/s00520-017-3586-y",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "25",
pages = "1759--1768",
journal = "Supportive Care in Cancer",
issn = "0941-4355",
publisher = "Springer Verlag",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - A mindful self-compassion videoconference intervention for nationally recruited posttreatment young adult cancer survivors

T2 - Supportive Care in Cancer

AU - Campo,Rebecca A.

AU - Bluth,Karen

AU - Santacroce,Sheila J.

AU - Knapik,Sarah

AU - Tan,Julia

AU - Gold,Stuart

AU - Philips,Kamaira

AU - Gaylord,Susan

AU - Asher,Gary N.

PY - 2017/6/1

Y1 - 2017/6/1

N2 - Purpose: Young adult (YA) cancer survivors report substantial distress, social isolation, and body image concerns that can impede successful reintegration into life years after treatment completion. Mindful Self-Compassion (MSC) interventions focus on developing mindfulness and self-compassion for managing distress, hardships, and perceived personal inadequacies. An MSC intervention would be beneficial in supporting YA survivors’ management of psychosocial challenges that arise in survivorship; however, a telehealth intervention modality is essential for reaching this geographically dispersed population. We conducted a single-arm feasibility study of an MSC 8-week videoconference intervention for nationally recruited YA survivors (ages 18–29). Methods: The MSC intervention was group-based, 90-minute videoconference sessions, held weekly over 8 weeks, with audio-supplemented home practice. Feasibility and acceptability were assessed via attendance rate and an intervention satisfaction scale. Baseline to post-intervention changes in psychosocial outcomes (body image, anxiety, depression, social isolation, posttraumatic growth, resilience, self-compassion, mindfulness) were assessed using paired t tests and Cohen’s d effect sizes. Results: Thirty-four participants were consented and 25 attended a videoconference group. Feasibility was established with 84% attending at least six of the eight sessions, and intervention acceptability was high (M = 4.36, SD = 0.40, score range = 1–5). All psychosocial outcomes, except for resilience, demonstrated significant changes (p < 0.002), with medium to large effect sizes (Cohen’s d > 0.5). Conclusion: YA survivors are interested in receiving an MSC videoconference intervention. Feasibility, acceptance, and potential psychosocial benefits of the intervention were demonstrated. Findings can be applied toward the design of an efficacy randomized controlled trial to improve quality of life for YA survivors in transition after cancer treatment.

AB - Purpose: Young adult (YA) cancer survivors report substantial distress, social isolation, and body image concerns that can impede successful reintegration into life years after treatment completion. Mindful Self-Compassion (MSC) interventions focus on developing mindfulness and self-compassion for managing distress, hardships, and perceived personal inadequacies. An MSC intervention would be beneficial in supporting YA survivors’ management of psychosocial challenges that arise in survivorship; however, a telehealth intervention modality is essential for reaching this geographically dispersed population. We conducted a single-arm feasibility study of an MSC 8-week videoconference intervention for nationally recruited YA survivors (ages 18–29). Methods: The MSC intervention was group-based, 90-minute videoconference sessions, held weekly over 8 weeks, with audio-supplemented home practice. Feasibility and acceptability were assessed via attendance rate and an intervention satisfaction scale. Baseline to post-intervention changes in psychosocial outcomes (body image, anxiety, depression, social isolation, posttraumatic growth, resilience, self-compassion, mindfulness) were assessed using paired t tests and Cohen’s d effect sizes. Results: Thirty-four participants were consented and 25 attended a videoconference group. Feasibility was established with 84% attending at least six of the eight sessions, and intervention acceptability was high (M = 4.36, SD = 0.40, score range = 1–5). All psychosocial outcomes, except for resilience, demonstrated significant changes (p < 0.002), with medium to large effect sizes (Cohen’s d > 0.5). Conclusion: YA survivors are interested in receiving an MSC videoconference intervention. Feasibility, acceptance, and potential psychosocial benefits of the intervention were demonstrated. Findings can be applied toward the design of an efficacy randomized controlled trial to improve quality of life for YA survivors in transition after cancer treatment.

KW - Feasibility study

KW - Intervention

KW - Mindfulness

KW - Self-compassion

KW - Videoconference

KW - Young adult cancer survivors

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85009833705&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85009833705&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s00520-017-3586-y

DO - 10.1007/s00520-017-3586-y

M3 - Article

VL - 25

SP - 1759

EP - 1768

JO - Supportive Care in Cancer

JF - Supportive Care in Cancer

SN - 0941-4355

IS - 6

ER -