A longitudinal analysis of resource mobilisation among forced and voluntary return migrants in Mexico

Jacqueline M Hagan, Joshua Wassink, Brianna Castro

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The rise in U.S. deportations has resulted in a growing number of studies focused on the reintegration experiences of these migrants in their home communities. Based on interviews with deportees shortly after their arrival home, these studies paint a picture of economic gloom, finding that deportees are too frequently stigmatised by governments and employers and consequently unemployed or working on the margins of their home economies. In contrast, our longitudinal and comparative study, which draws on the findings of 93 deported and voluntary migrants in Leon, Mexico, finds convergence in the labour market trajectories and social mobility outcomes of deportees and non-deportees, which reduces initial labour market disparities over time. We found that deportation can stymie migrants’ initial labour market re-entry, often relegating former migrants to undesirable jobs in the informal labour market, while they re-familiarise themselves with their local labour markets and identify promising opportunities. Yet, in the long run, successful reintegration depends primarily on the acquisition and mobilisation of human and financial capital across the migratory circuit.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages170-189
Number of pages20
JournalJournal of Ethnic and Migration Studies
Volume45
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2 2019

Fingerprint

mobilization
labor market
Mexico
migrant
deportation
resources
reintegration
occupational reintegration
Social Mobility
human capital
employer
finance
Resources
Mobilization
Migrants
Longitudinal Analysis
Labour Market
economy
interview
community

Keywords

  • Mexico
  • Return migration
  • deportation
  • human capital
  • labour markets

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Demography
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

Cite this

A longitudinal analysis of resource mobilisation among forced and voluntary return migrants in Mexico. / Hagan, Jacqueline M; Wassink, Joshua; Castro, Brianna.

In: Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies, Vol. 45, No. 1, 02.01.2019, p. 170-189.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{0702db4e0c354e88a2f554697d4d5519,
title = "A longitudinal analysis of resource mobilisation among forced and voluntary return migrants in Mexico",
abstract = "The rise in U.S. deportations has resulted in a growing number of studies focused on the reintegration experiences of these migrants in their home communities. Based on interviews with deportees shortly after their arrival home, these studies paint a picture of economic gloom, finding that deportees are too frequently stigmatised by governments and employers and consequently unemployed or working on the margins of their home economies. In contrast, our longitudinal and comparative study, which draws on the findings of 93 deported and voluntary migrants in Leon, Mexico, finds convergence in the labour market trajectories and social mobility outcomes of deportees and non-deportees, which reduces initial labour market disparities over time. We found that deportation can stymie migrants’ initial labour market re-entry, often relegating former migrants to undesirable jobs in the informal labour market, while they re-familiarise themselves with their local labour markets and identify promising opportunities. Yet, in the long run, successful reintegration depends primarily on the acquisition and mobilisation of human and financial capital across the migratory circuit.",
keywords = "Mexico, Return migration, deportation, human capital, labour markets",
author = "Hagan, {Jacqueline M} and Joshua Wassink and Brianna Castro",
year = "2019",
month = "1",
day = "2",
doi = "10.1080/1369183X.2018.1454305",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "45",
pages = "170--189",
journal = "Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies",
issn = "1369-183X",
publisher = "Routledge",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - A longitudinal analysis of resource mobilisation among forced and voluntary return migrants in Mexico

AU - Hagan, Jacqueline M

AU - Wassink, Joshua

AU - Castro, Brianna

PY - 2019/1/2

Y1 - 2019/1/2

N2 - The rise in U.S. deportations has resulted in a growing number of studies focused on the reintegration experiences of these migrants in their home communities. Based on interviews with deportees shortly after their arrival home, these studies paint a picture of economic gloom, finding that deportees are too frequently stigmatised by governments and employers and consequently unemployed or working on the margins of their home economies. In contrast, our longitudinal and comparative study, which draws on the findings of 93 deported and voluntary migrants in Leon, Mexico, finds convergence in the labour market trajectories and social mobility outcomes of deportees and non-deportees, which reduces initial labour market disparities over time. We found that deportation can stymie migrants’ initial labour market re-entry, often relegating former migrants to undesirable jobs in the informal labour market, while they re-familiarise themselves with their local labour markets and identify promising opportunities. Yet, in the long run, successful reintegration depends primarily on the acquisition and mobilisation of human and financial capital across the migratory circuit.

AB - The rise in U.S. deportations has resulted in a growing number of studies focused on the reintegration experiences of these migrants in their home communities. Based on interviews with deportees shortly after their arrival home, these studies paint a picture of economic gloom, finding that deportees are too frequently stigmatised by governments and employers and consequently unemployed or working on the margins of their home economies. In contrast, our longitudinal and comparative study, which draws on the findings of 93 deported and voluntary migrants in Leon, Mexico, finds convergence in the labour market trajectories and social mobility outcomes of deportees and non-deportees, which reduces initial labour market disparities over time. We found that deportation can stymie migrants’ initial labour market re-entry, often relegating former migrants to undesirable jobs in the informal labour market, while they re-familiarise themselves with their local labour markets and identify promising opportunities. Yet, in the long run, successful reintegration depends primarily on the acquisition and mobilisation of human and financial capital across the migratory circuit.

KW - Mexico

KW - Return migration

KW - deportation

KW - human capital

KW - labour markets

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85044457570&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85044457570&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/1369183X.2018.1454305

DO - 10.1080/1369183X.2018.1454305

M3 - Article

VL - 45

SP - 170

EP - 189

JO - Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies

T2 - Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies

JF - Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies

SN - 1369-183X

IS - 1

ER -