A cross-sectional analysis of radiographic ankle osteoarthritis frequency and associated factors: The Johnston County osteoarthritis project

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Abstract

Objective. Because there are no epidemiologic data regarding the frequency of ankle osteoarthritis (OA) in a general population, we sought to analyze this disabling condition in a large, well-characterized, community-based cohort of older individuals. Methods. Cross-sectional data, including ankle radiographs, were from the most recent data collection (2013-2015) of the Johnston County OA Project. Radiographic ankle OA (rAOA) was defined as a Kellgren-Lawrence arthritis grading scale of ≥ 2 on weight-bearing lateral and mortise radiographs. The presence of pain, aching, or stiffness in the ankles as well as history of ankle injury (limiting ability to walk for at least 2 days) were assessed. Chi-square statistics (categorical variables) and Student t tests (continuous variables) were used to compare all participant characteristics by rAOA status. Joint-based logistic regression models with generalized estimating equations were used to examine associations of rAOA and covariates of interest [age, body mass index (BMI), sex, race, ankle symptoms, and injury history]. Results. Of 864 participants with available data, 68% were women, 34% were African American, with a mean age of 72 years and BMI of 31 kg/m2. Nearly 7% of this sample had rAOA. Increasing age, high BMI, history of ankle injury, and presence of ankle symptoms were all independently associated with greater odds of having rAOA; no significant differences were seen by sex or race. Conclusion. The frequency of rAOA was higher than estimates generally quoted in the literature. While injury was an important contributor, other factors such as age, BMI, and symptoms were also significantly associated with rAOA.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages499-504
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Rheumatology
Volume44
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2017

Fingerprint

Ankle
Osteoarthritis
Cross-Sectional Studies
Body Mass Index
Ankle Injuries
Logistic Models
Aptitude
Weight-Bearing
African Americans
Arthritis
Joints
Students
Pain
Wounds and Injuries
Population

Keywords

  • ANKLE
  • EPIDEMIOLOGY
  • OSTEOARTHRITIS

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rheumatology
  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology

Cite this

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title = "A cross-sectional analysis of radiographic ankle osteoarthritis frequency and associated factors: The Johnston County osteoarthritis project",
abstract = "Objective. Because there are no epidemiologic data regarding the frequency of ankle osteoarthritis (OA) in a general population, we sought to analyze this disabling condition in a large, well-characterized, community-based cohort of older individuals. Methods. Cross-sectional data, including ankle radiographs, were from the most recent data collection (2013-2015) of the Johnston County OA Project. Radiographic ankle OA (rAOA) was defined as a Kellgren-Lawrence arthritis grading scale of ≥ 2 on weight-bearing lateral and mortise radiographs. The presence of pain, aching, or stiffness in the ankles as well as history of ankle injury (limiting ability to walk for at least 2 days) were assessed. Chi-square statistics (categorical variables) and Student t tests (continuous variables) were used to compare all participant characteristics by rAOA status. Joint-based logistic regression models with generalized estimating equations were used to examine associations of rAOA and covariates of interest [age, body mass index (BMI), sex, race, ankle symptoms, and injury history]. Results. Of 864 participants with available data, 68% were women, 34% were African American, with a mean age of 72 years and BMI of 31 kg/m2. Nearly 7% of this sample had rAOA. Increasing age, high BMI, history of ankle injury, and presence of ankle symptoms were all independently associated with greater odds of having rAOA; no significant differences were seen by sex or race. Conclusion. The frequency of rAOA was higher than estimates generally quoted in the literature. While injury was an important contributor, other factors such as age, BMI, and symptoms were also significantly associated with rAOA.",
keywords = "ANKLE, EPIDEMIOLOGY, OSTEOARTHRITIS",
author = "Shahmeer Lateef and Golightly, {Yvonne M.} and Renner, {Jordan B.} and Jordan, {Joanne M.} and Nelson, {Amanda E.}",
year = "2017",
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doi = "10.3899/jrheum.161076",
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AU - Jordan,Joanne M.

AU - Nelson,Amanda E.

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N2 - Objective. Because there are no epidemiologic data regarding the frequency of ankle osteoarthritis (OA) in a general population, we sought to analyze this disabling condition in a large, well-characterized, community-based cohort of older individuals. Methods. Cross-sectional data, including ankle radiographs, were from the most recent data collection (2013-2015) of the Johnston County OA Project. Radiographic ankle OA (rAOA) was defined as a Kellgren-Lawrence arthritis grading scale of ≥ 2 on weight-bearing lateral and mortise radiographs. The presence of pain, aching, or stiffness in the ankles as well as history of ankle injury (limiting ability to walk for at least 2 days) were assessed. Chi-square statistics (categorical variables) and Student t tests (continuous variables) were used to compare all participant characteristics by rAOA status. Joint-based logistic regression models with generalized estimating equations were used to examine associations of rAOA and covariates of interest [age, body mass index (BMI), sex, race, ankle symptoms, and injury history]. Results. Of 864 participants with available data, 68% were women, 34% were African American, with a mean age of 72 years and BMI of 31 kg/m2. Nearly 7% of this sample had rAOA. Increasing age, high BMI, history of ankle injury, and presence of ankle symptoms were all independently associated with greater odds of having rAOA; no significant differences were seen by sex or race. Conclusion. The frequency of rAOA was higher than estimates generally quoted in the literature. While injury was an important contributor, other factors such as age, BMI, and symptoms were also significantly associated with rAOA.

AB - Objective. Because there are no epidemiologic data regarding the frequency of ankle osteoarthritis (OA) in a general population, we sought to analyze this disabling condition in a large, well-characterized, community-based cohort of older individuals. Methods. Cross-sectional data, including ankle radiographs, were from the most recent data collection (2013-2015) of the Johnston County OA Project. Radiographic ankle OA (rAOA) was defined as a Kellgren-Lawrence arthritis grading scale of ≥ 2 on weight-bearing lateral and mortise radiographs. The presence of pain, aching, or stiffness in the ankles as well as history of ankle injury (limiting ability to walk for at least 2 days) were assessed. Chi-square statistics (categorical variables) and Student t tests (continuous variables) were used to compare all participant characteristics by rAOA status. Joint-based logistic regression models with generalized estimating equations were used to examine associations of rAOA and covariates of interest [age, body mass index (BMI), sex, race, ankle symptoms, and injury history]. Results. Of 864 participants with available data, 68% were women, 34% were African American, with a mean age of 72 years and BMI of 31 kg/m2. Nearly 7% of this sample had rAOA. Increasing age, high BMI, history of ankle injury, and presence of ankle symptoms were all independently associated with greater odds of having rAOA; no significant differences were seen by sex or race. Conclusion. The frequency of rAOA was higher than estimates generally quoted in the literature. While injury was an important contributor, other factors such as age, BMI, and symptoms were also significantly associated with rAOA.

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