A Conceptual Model of Financial Toxicity in Pediatric Oncology

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The purpose of this article is to explicate a conceptual framework for financial toxicity in pediatric oncology to guide nursing practice and research. The framework is based on one for financial outcomes of severe illness attributed to Scott Ramsey and adapted by the National Cancer Institute to describe relationships between preexisting factors, a cancer diagnosis, financial distress, and health outcomes for adult cancer patients and survivors. The adaption for pediatric oncology was informed by the results of a systematic scoping review to identify advances and gaps in the recent literature about the personal costs of illness to parents in the pediatric oncology context. The conceptual model for pediatric oncology indicates that existing and dynamic parent and family factors, other risk and protective factors, the child’s diagnosis and treatment, and treatment-related financial costs can affect parent financial coping behaviors and parent health and family financial outcomes, all of which may affect child outcomes. Additionally, nursing’s historic emphasis on holistic care, quality of life, and health determinants justify attention to financial toxicity as a nursing role. Therefore, pediatric oncology nurses must be sensitive to financial toxicity and related risk factors, become comfortable communicating about treatment-related financial costs and financial distress with parents and other health professionals, and collaborate in efforts that draw on the expertise of multiple stakeholders to identify potential or actual financial toxicity in parents and mitigate its impact on childhood cancer health outcomes through direct care, referral, research, quality improvement, and health advocacy.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages6-16
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Pediatric Oncology Nursing
Volume36
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

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Pediatrics
Parents
Health
Nursing
Costs and Cost Analysis
Neoplasms
Nursing Research
Cost of Illness
National Cancer Institute (U.S.)
Family Health
Family Relations
Psychological Adaptation
Quality Improvement
Survivors
Therapeutics
Referral and Consultation
Quality of Life
Delivery of Health Care
Research
Protective Factors

Keywords

  • cost
  • economic
  • material hardship
  • quality of life

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics
  • Oncology(nursing)

Cite this

A Conceptual Model of Financial Toxicity in Pediatric Oncology. / Santacroce, Sheila Judge; Kneipp, Shawn M.

In: Journal of Pediatric Oncology Nursing, Vol. 36, No. 1, 01.01.2019, p. 6-16.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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