A Cluster-Randomized Trial of a Mobile Produce Market Program in 12 Communities in North Carolina: Program Development, Methods, and Baseline Characteristics

Lucia A. Leone, Gina L. Tripicchio, Lindsey Haynes-Maslow, Jared McGuirt, Jaqueline S. Grady Smith, Janelle Armstrong-Brown, Sarah D. Kowitt, Ziya Gizlice, Alice S Ammerman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Mobile markets are an increasingly popular method for providing access to fresh fruits and vegetables (F/V) in underserved communities; however, evaluation of these programs is limited, as are descriptions of their development, study designs, and needs of the populations they serve. Objective: Our aim was to describe the development and theoretical basis for Veggie Van (VV), a mobile produce market intervention, the study design for the VV evaluation, and baseline characteristics of the study population. Design: The protocol and sample for a cluster-randomized controlled trial with 12 sites are described. Participants/setting: Community partner organizations in the Triangle region of North Carolina that primarily served lower-income families or were located in areas that had limited access to fresh produce were recruited. Eligible individuals at each site (older than 18 years of age, self-identified as the main shoppers for their household, and expressed interest in using a mobile market) were targeted for enrollment. A total of 201 participants at 12 sites participated in the VV program and evaluation, which was implemented from November 2013 to March 2016. Main outcome measures: Change in F/V intake (cups/day), derived from self-reported responses to the National Cancer Institute F/V screener, was the main outcome measure. Statistical analyses performed: We performed a descriptive analysis of baseline sample characteristics. Results: Mean reported F/V intake was 3.4 cups/day. Participants reported generally having some access to fresh F/V, and 57.7% agreed they could afford enough F/V to feed their family. The most frequently cited barriers were cost (55.7%) and time to prepare F/V (20.4%). Self-efficacy was lowest for buying more F/V than usual and trying new vegetables. Conclusions: By addressing cost and convenience and building skills for purchasing and preparing F/V, the VV has the potential to improve F/V consumption in underserved communities.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages57-68
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics
Volume119
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

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Program Development
program planning
Vegetables
Fruit
vegetables
markets
vegetable consumption
fruit consumption
fruits
raw vegetables
purchasing
raw fruit
experimental design
methodology
low income households
self-efficacy
program evaluation
Program Evaluation
fresh produce
households

Keywords

  • Cluster-randomized trial
  • Food environment
  • Fruits and vegetables
  • Lower-income
  • Mobile market

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

A Cluster-Randomized Trial of a Mobile Produce Market Program in 12 Communities in North Carolina : Program Development, Methods, and Baseline Characteristics. / Leone, Lucia A.; Tripicchio, Gina L.; Haynes-Maslow, Lindsey; McGuirt, Jared; Grady Smith, Jaqueline S.; Armstrong-Brown, Janelle; Kowitt, Sarah D.; Gizlice, Ziya; Ammerman, Alice S.

In: Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, Vol. 119, No. 1, 01.01.2019, p. 57-68.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Leone, Lucia A. ; Tripicchio, Gina L. ; Haynes-Maslow, Lindsey ; McGuirt, Jared ; Grady Smith, Jaqueline S. ; Armstrong-Brown, Janelle ; Kowitt, Sarah D. ; Gizlice, Ziya ; Ammerman, Alice S. / A Cluster-Randomized Trial of a Mobile Produce Market Program in 12 Communities in North Carolina : Program Development, Methods, and Baseline Characteristics. In: Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. 2019 ; Vol. 119, No. 1. pp. 57-68.
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