[80] Isolation, Rapid Freezing, and Freeze-Fracture Methods for Frog Retinal Photoreceptors

Joseph M. Corless, M. Joseph Costello

Research output: Research - peer-reviewArticle

  • 6 Citations

Abstract

This chapter discusses the isolation, rapid freezing, and freeze-fracture methods for frog retinal photoreceptors. The freeze-fracture technique involves four essential steps: (1) rapid freezing of the specimen; (2) specimen fracture; (3) heavy metal replication of the exposed fracture surfaces; followed by deposition of a reinforcing film such as carbon; and (4) recovery of the replica, which is then examined in a transmission or scanning electron microscope. Freeze-fracture methods are employed in morphological studies when one wishes to preserve a structure in a state that most closely approximates its native configuration. Fixation of the structure is achieved by specimen freezing. Specimen preparation is primarily dictated by experimental objective. Specimen freezing rates are determined by the mass, geometry, and material properties of the sample and supporting planchette and by the freezing method employed.

LanguageEnglish (US)
Pages585-593
Number of pages9
JournalMethods in Enzymology
Volume81
Issue numberC
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1982

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Vertebrate Photoreceptor Cells
Anura
Freezing
Heavy Metals
Carbon
Electrons
Specimen preparation
Materials properties
Electron microscopes
Scanning
Recovery
Geometry

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology

Cite this

[80] Isolation, Rapid Freezing, and Freeze-Fracture Methods for Frog Retinal Photoreceptors. / Corless, Joseph M.; Joseph Costello, M.

In: Methods in Enzymology, Vol. 81, No. C, 01.01.1982, p. 585-593.

Research output: Research - peer-reviewArticle

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