Pregnancy Associated Breast Cancer: A Pooled Analysis of 18 Prospective Cohorts

Project: Research project

Description

The goal of this research is to study pregnancy-associated breast cancer by combining data from 18 prospective studies of breast cancer. Pregnancy is recognized to have a dual effect on breast cancer risk: a short-term increase in risk followed by a long-term protective effect. Early research focused on hormone level changes during pregnancy; however, new research suggests that tissue changes related to breast feeding may stimulate the growth and migration of cancer cells (in the short term). Breast cancers diagnosed in the years after childbirth are more often at an advanced stage and have high mortality, especially if a woman is older than 30. Unlike rates among older women, advanced stage breast cancer rates among reproductive-age women have increased in recent years. Very large numbers of women are needed to understand pregnancy-associated breast cancer because breast cancer incidence overall is low among reproductive-age women. Individual studies rarely have sufficient numbers to evaluate the increase in breast cancer following pregnancy according to subtypes (defined by estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and HER-2 expression). With data from >1,000,000 women and >15,000 breast cancers among women
StatusFinished
Effective start/end date1/1/1512/31/16

Funding

  • Avon Foundation

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Breast Neoplasms
Pregnancy
Research
Progesterone Receptors
Breast Feeding
Estrogen Receptors
Cell Movement
Parturition
Hormones
Prospective Studies
Mortality
Incidence
Growth
Neoplasms